Canada Vimy Ridge Essay

Canada's Victory In The Battle Of Vimy Ridge

In the spring of 1917, the battle of Vimy Ridge took place. As the Germans occupied it, the British had fought long and hard, but had failed to capture it after many attempts. Their immediate solution was to order the Canadians to try and capture this valuable piece of land once and for all. Unlike the British, the Canadians had taken time to think up a plan, which would catch the Germans off guard. The plan suggested that the Canadians make a dummy hill of Vimy Ridge, so that they memorize every spot on the hill. The Canadians built a full-scale replica of the ground over which their troops would have to attack, giving all units the chance to practice their attacking movements The Canadians had also learned to fight with the German machine guns, which allowed them to use the German’s weapons against them. The main part of the plan was called the “Rolling Curtain”. As bombs would be going off at the German trenches, the Canadians would follow behind them, instead of waiting for the Germans to get to their positions, like the British let them do. As the Rolling Curtain was a success, the Germans exited their trenches, to find the Canadians waiting there with their weapons. After a short period of time, 8 hours to be exact, the Canadians were able to recapture Vimy Ridge. They were able to capture 3700 Germans; however they suffered a loss of 3000 courageous soldiers.

Throughout the past years, Canada has had many memorable moments. The Battle of Vimy Ridge is a moment in history that Canada should be proud of. This was the first major gain for the British in the war, which led them to success later on, this was a key component in Canada’s move to become and independent country, and it earned respect for Canadians all over the world. When the Canadians were able to take Vimy Ridge in eight hours, they became known as a country, instead of another nation under the British Empire.

As the British had been trying to take Vimy Ridge by using the same plan over and over again, they had failed, and called in the Canadian Corps to bail them out. Since this was the first major battle won for the British, it gave them the courage, confidence and the proper mindset to go into the rest of the war with their heads held high. Vimy Ridge was the deepest advance the Allies had made in over two years of war. Canadians all around the world should be proud of the Canadian victory at Vimy Ridge, as this changed the outcome of the war. Vimy Ridge was a key to the German defence system. If the Canadians had not succeeded in capturing Vimy Ridge, the German’s woud have still posessed a key position, in which the Allies would have a tough time getting around. If the Canadians had not taken Vimy Ridge from...

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Essay on The Battle of Vimy Ridge: The Birth of The Canadian Nation

1355 Words6 Pages

One of Canada’s largest military endeavors was the battle of Vimy Ridge during World War One. It was a fierce battle between Germans and Canadians. Canada was trying to take over the German controlled ridge, which ran from northwest to southwest between Lens and Arras, France. Its highest point was 145 feet above sea level, which was exceptionally helpful in battle because of the very flat landscape. Already over 200,000 men had fallen at Vimy, all desperately trying to take or defend this important and strategic ridge. As a result of its success in taking the ridge, Canada gained a lot more than just the strategic point. Canada was united as a nation, and the victory changed the way other counties viewed them. Canadians no longer…show more content…

Not only did the battle affect the way Canadian’s allies saw them, it also affected their enemies. German veterans have told stories about the war, revealing that some Germans feared Canadian soldiers more than soldiers of any other country. At the start of the war, Canadians were not really viewed as independent Canadian soldiers, but rather, soldiers of the British military force. As a result of their achievements at Vimy Ridge, Canada was granted their own seat at the signing of the Treaty of Versailles after the war. Clearly, the battle of Vimy Ridge created Canada as a nation in the eyes of other countries.

The feats achieved by Canadians were incredible, and more influential than anything they had done before. Vimy was one of the German’s most heavily guarded areas, and it was thought that it was impossible to over take. However, when the Canadians did take it, they captured the most artillery and guns since the start of the war. They also managed to take 4,000 Germans as prisoners of war. Past battles at Vimy witnessed over 200,000 causalities. During the Canadian attack on the ridge, they lost 3,598 soldiers while the Germans suffered over 20,000 causalities. Canadians had much to be proud of after Vimy, a feeling they did not often get while fighting under British command. Critics question whether Vimy aided Canada’s birth as a nation. “It is difficult to avoid the conclusion that if Vimy Ridge had been captured

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